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Russian traditions

A Guide to Moscow’s May Festivals 2020

Fireworks in Moscow

We’ll tell you how to make the best of your May holidays in Russia 2020 The calendar of holidays in Russia is quite intense. On the one hand, it is connected with the great history of the country, on the other hand, Russians just love holidays! Russia’s holiday calendar is a great reflection of its…

Old Russian Cuisine: Forgotten Dishes and Drinks

Danilovsky

What Do We Know About Russian Cuisine? Moscow is a huge metropolis where 24/7 you can get almost everything you need. This city offers you a big variety of good, but it is not an easy task to find a restaurant with traditional pre-revolutionary Russian cuisine. The truth is that we only know a little…

Russian Orthodox Dress Code & Top 5 Major Cathedrals in Moscow

Orthodox Church

Churches in Moscow Once you’re in Moscow you’ll be amazed by the number of beautiful golden, black and blue-domed buildings all around the city, especially in the city center wherever you turn around. These are Russian Orthodox churches. Russians by the majority of the population are Christians, although all confessions are well presented here, but…

Uncover Hidden Treasures of Moscow

Café-Pushkin

Uncover Hidden Treasures of Moscow From Café Pushkin to another Kremlin which is not on Red Square There are so many things to do and places to visit in Moscow. So, please, don’t limit yourself to what a normal guest usually sees in the capital of Russia, I mean, pop tourist attractions such as Red…

Vodka: Theory and Practice

Vodka-cheers-during-evening-drinking-tour

It’s time to talk about the most stereotypical Russian drink. About Vodka, of course! Most likely you have already heard something about this strong beverage: 40% alcohol by volume, characteristic taste, and smell and crystal clear as water. To the point, a name vodka is a diminutive form of the Slavic word “voda” (water).

Most famous Russian women

pasted-image-01

Historical Background On this day there were mass demonstrations of women in Petrograd, who demanded the right to vote (look at the banner in the picture) and protested against famine and World War I. Four days later Tsar Nicholas II signed an order that allowed women to vote but it didn’t help to stop revolutionary…

How Russians Celebrate Maslenitsa: Profound Guide

Maslenitsa in Russia

We’ll tell you how to celebrate Maslenitsa as Russians do! Curious facts about Maslenitsa: You may call it ‘Russian Mardi Gras’ or even ‘Beltane’. And there are many other analogs: ‘Fastelovend’ in Cologne, ‘Fassenacht’ in Mainz, Carnival in Rhineland and other similar celebrations in the Czech Republic, Denmark and England. Back to history According to…